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William Vincent’s list of programming books for 2019

Will Vincent, author of Django for Beginners and Rest APIs with Django has his list of book recommendations for the year.
Read the latest posts on his website to get at them.

If you are a learner like me and wanted a professionally filtered list, (as in too lazy to go hunt them down), this is a godsend.
He covers books on Django, React, Flask, & JavaScript and tutorials for Python, Django & React.

Also check out his year in review.

Thank you muchly, Will.


Reasons to Write #339

Reasons to Write #339

From Eric Barker’s, “The 3-Step Evening Ritual That Will Make You Happy
Writing helped people suffering from depression, anxiety or PTSD.
It helped their relationships too. But that wasn’t all …

Their physical health improved as well.

Women with breast cancer reported fewer symptoms and required fewer cancer-related doctor visits. People with asthma and arthritis “reported meaningful improvements in quality of life similar to benefits that would be expected by a successful new drug treatment.”

They landed jobs.

Within three months, 27 percent of the experimental participants landed jobs compared with less than 5 percent of those in the time management and no-writing comparison groups.

They gained insight.

what’s the biggest benefit people report after a few evenings of expressive writing? “Insight.” Most people said they understood themselves better. They felt more meaning in life. To my knowledge, nobody has ever reported effects like that from buying a ShamWow or a Foreman Grill.

Want to know how all this writing sorcery works?

Read the whole article over at Eric’s blog.


Are You Learning Something New This Year? This Course Will Help.

Learning a new skill this year?
Putting your mind to learn programming?
Looking to wow folks with your newly acquired French?
A professional exam, you want to ace?

And yet, as you look back over years of broken resolutions, you think it might not be worth it?
That you aren’t cut out for learning physics on your own if you wanted to?
That you are “slow”?

Maybe that’s just because you haven’t realised that learning itself is a skill?
That you need to learn, how to learn?

Barbara Oakley has been teaching this critical skill for a few years now.
Her course on Learning How to Learn is the most popular course in the world.

How do you beat procrastination?
Do we still need to memorise?
How important is sleep?
What is learning?

Barbara takes you through all these and dives deeper into brain chemistry and modes of learning and a whole lot more!
At the end, you get prepared to learn anything.
Barbara’s story also serves as tremendous inspiration. A girl who flunked Maths & Science as a kid is now a distinguished professor of engineering.

The course is spread over 4 weeks
And it’s free!
The only thing that is needed of you is to commit.
And even that is not too much. 12-15 hours spread over 4 weeks.

You can go enroll in the course here.
If you are pressed for time or are a student, you can go enroll in the youth oriented version of the course here.

And hurry! Today is the last day to enroll.

Imagine spending 15 measly hours to learn a skill that will then enable you to learn and master anything that you set your mind to!
Here’s to a Happy New Year full of learning!
Jason

P.S. As a Happy New Year to me, you could do me a favor and forward this mail to folks and asking them to subcribe to the list here.
https://janusworx.com/subscribe-mail.html


Be Persistent

More Gaiman truisms for me.
He talks about writing.
Holds true for all of my endeavours though.

lazynoodlepuff asked: Hi Neil, I wonder what could tell not native speaker like me. I struggle with writing anything. Words don't flow in my native language and in English it's even more difficult. Sonetimes I struggle with every sentence. But I really want to create things in English and be a part of English-speaking culture. Is this too much to try learn not only to write but also write in another language? I feel like I am so far behind everyone and have to try so hard just to keep up (I moved to the UK to study)

Two of the finest writers of English – Nabokov and Conrad – were not native speakers.
So I would not worry.
It’s okay to struggle.
Just have patience with yourself, and keep learning.


Write with Respect and Interest

For me. For posterity. From Neil Gaiman.

miriams-song asked: Hey Neil. Someone recently told me that because I’m not ethnically Jewish (I’m a conversion student set to be “official” within the next year), I shouldn’t be writing ethnically Jewish characters. What do you think? I’ve been actively involved with my Jewish community for years so accusations like that are pretty hurtful.

As a writer of fiction part of your duty and obligation is to write characters who are not you.
Write them well, write them with respect and interest.
And don’t listen to anyone who tells you you aren’t allowed to write people who aren’t you.
You are.


How to Think Better

Scott H Young on writing as a tool to sharpen your thinking.

From the article …

First, by jotting down your thoughts on paper, you can hold more ideas than you could in your limited working memory. This means you can more easily work through thoughts that have several parts which are difficult to keep in mind simultaneously.

Second, writing allows editing. If I write down an idea, then later notice a contradiction further down the page, I can go back and edit it. Editing mentally quickly becomes exhausting as, like in the n-back task, the old information interferes with the new.

Third, writing allows for longer thoughts. Have you ever had a conversation where, as you were listening, you forgot the point you were eager to make? Ideas bubble up and pop all the time in our minds, it’s only with writing that you can capture it.

Now that you know why to write, maybe you’re wondering how?

Go on, read the entire post here, to find out.