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Posts about dgplug (old posts, page 6)

Book Review – i want 2 do project. tell me wat 2 do

Click me to buy!


TL;DR? It’s awesome. Buy it right now.

I was looking to dip my toes into some sort of structured help with the summer training and open source in general, because while I knew what I wanted, I just didn’t know how to go about it.

And then I realised that one of our mentors had actually gone and written a whole book on the how to. So, I bought the paperback. The binding is really good, the paper really nice (unlike other tech books I’ve read) and the words large enough to read. I expect to get a lot of use, out of the book.

And lot of use is right. While it’s a slim volume and a pretty quick read, the book is pretty dense when it comes to the wisdom it imparts.

The book has a simple (yet substantial to execute) premise. You’ve just tipped your toe into programming, or you’ve learnt a new language, or you’ve probably written a few programs or maybe you’re just brand new. You want to explore the vast thrilling world that is Open Source Software. What now?

“i want 2 do project. tell me wat 2 do.” answers the “what now” in painstaking detail.

From communication (Mailing List Guidelines) to the importance of focus (Attention to Detail) to working with mentors (the Project chapters) to the tools (Methodology & tools) to the importance of sharpening the saw (Reading …) and finally the importance of your environment (Sustenance), the book covers the entire gamut that a student or a novice programmer with open source would go through.

Shakthi writes like he speaks; pithily, concisely with the weight of his experience behind his words.

The book is chockfull of quotes (from the Lady Lovelace to Menaechmus to Taleb) that lend heft to the chapters. The references at the end of each chapter will probably keep me busy for the next few months.

The book’ll save you enormous amounts of time and heartache, in your journey, were you to heed its advice. It’s that good.

How to read, how to write, how to make sense of life, with Robert Green




I’m a big fan of Shane Parrish’s, The Knowledge Project.
Last night, I finished Episode 35, with Robert Green.

If you have trouble figuring out how to read, or take notes, and synthesize what you learn, go listen to how a master does it. (Spoiler, it’s pretty low tech)
Take what he teaches and adapt it digitally if you want.

Robert taught it to my favorite Stoic author, Ryan Holiday who’s given a good description of it, here in his Medium post.
And if you really want to get into the weeds, Ryan breaks it all down here, in along post replete with photos

You’ll find the shownotes with links here. Give it a listen.

All of this to say, Read more! Write more!
After your first programming language, writing is the most important skill you’ll pick up as a programmer who wants to make a mark.
You have to write daily!

The way you train reflects the way you fight. People say I’m not going to train too hard, I’m going to do this in training, but when it’s time to fight I’m going to step up. There is no step up. You’re just going to do what you did every day.”

— Georges St. Pierre

Programming, Day 50

It’s taken me 50 days to somehow figure out a way to study.
I still feel like Sisyphus.
But I realise now, that I have the map. The land isn’t large and unknown as I feared earlier.
I just need to keep my head down and take it step by step.

Read more…

Learning Aha

I’ve been moaning and bitching the past couple of years about how smart I was in my teens and how I could learn any darn thing I set my mind to, then.

My school grades did not reflect it though.

And these days, my consulting solutions have been top notch, and yet, I struggle to sharpen the saw.

What gives?

Read more…

Programming, Day 43

Guess I’ll call it a day, learning Vim.
Done about 16 hours1 of Vim reading and practice.
The rest of the 4 hours will come from daily Vim use now.
Have begun to use it for darn near everything.

Can move about with slight ease and copy & paste with lots of unease.
Practice makes perfect, I suppose.

Plan for the day, since I’m home sick?
Well I’m a gonna swing for the fences and finish the Lutz book.

Will update at night.

P.S. Bonus todo
Got to see if I can do a #100daysofcode run with Python.
If I can, I ought to start.

Update (10.30) – Ok, huge overstimation. Lutz will take time.
Looking at doing Lutz chapters as my #100daysofcode challenge.
Update (11.00) - I like this. talking to myself.
Wonder if I should move Nikola and run it from the server itself, so I can ssh and use it from anywhere?
Update (18.00) - Well, the day was a bust. Slept all day. Did nothing :)


  1. Committing to learning something just for 20 hours to get good enough is easily the best thing I’ve learnt this year!