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Posts about dgplug (old posts, page 12)

Study, Day 1

Day 1 is an disaster of fantastical proportions.
I did lots of stuff.
But I got nothing of consequence done.
Save one big thing.
I managed to buckle down and study for six hours.
That counts as a win, a big one in my book.
Will hopefully get more done tomorrow.
If you are following this blog, the days might soon seem out of sync.
That’s because I’ve decided that Wednesday, Thursday and Friday are my days of study. Monday & Tuesday are for work, while Satuday and Sunday are for home and family.
I need to practice what I preach and have margins and boundaries in my life.

French

  • Created cards and a review sesion

Python Problem

  • I decide to tackle this first thing in the morn and sank like a stone.
  • I yak shaved for 2 hours (git issues, setting up a dedicated desktop space for study, rsync issues, syncthing issues, crontab issues, more git issues)and then took nearly another hour trying to remember things and then by the time I had some idea of how to tackle the issue, it was lunch time. Hopefully better luck tomorrow

The MITx, 6.00.1x, Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python course

  • I am hopelessly behind and playing catch up.
  • Already missed the deadline for the week one exercises.
  • Hopefully will be all caught up by this time next week.

I learnt

  • that iterables are things that can be counted. like beads in a string, or on a rosary.
  • strings are a form of iterable.
  • Bisection searches to find square roots are much more efficient than having to go slowly guessing our way up.
  • I should not compare floating point numbers (e.g. test for equality). Their internal representations might just be subtly different. Instead use the absolute value of the difference of the two floats. abs(x-y) instead of x==y
  • Start with a basic set of code, check to see what it runs on, and then see if small changes to the code can solve other similar problems or improve the efficacy of existing ones. (Newton-Rhapson better to find roots than Bisection guess better than incremental exhaustive guessing)

The Best Writing Advice I Could Give You

Sometimes Seth Godin makes it easy for me to do the newsletter.
There’s a pithy post that says everything I want to say.
So, to the kids I coach, this is the best writing advice I could give you!
(Everything below the break is Seth, (emphases mine))


Decorating a car with bling, mudflaps and an airhorn is a form of signalling. You can show your peers that you have the resources to waste on superfluous adornments.

(Did you see what I just did there? I could have said, “You can show your friends that you have money to burn,” but I didn’t.)

Overwriting has a long tradition, particularly among academics. Make it a bit more complex and wordy than it needs to be. Write run-on sentences. Apparently, complicated writing must be more true.

One reason for this commitment to overwriting is that it keeps the hordes away. It’s difficult to read and hard to imagine writing. And so scarcity is created.

And yet, the articles and books that stand the test of time are straightforward. They’re memorable. They can be understood by the reader you seek to serve.

Simply write.

Write simply.

As few words as you need, but no fewer.

But simply write.


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French, Week 5

Similar sounding words are an absolute murder on the ears.
I can’t figure out moo and moue, kip and keep, and lots of bonne and bun.
Keeping at it though. Keeping at it. :)

Absolutely Make Time for Reading

From the Writing Routines1 pdf that is available on signing up to their mailing list…

“If I had a nickel for every person who ever told me he/she wanted to become a writer but “didn’t have time to read,” I could buy myself a pretty good steak dinner. Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”
Stephen King, On Writing

“I write two pages. And then I read and read and read.”
José Saramago, recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Literature

“I can’t begin to tell you the things I discovered while I was looking for something else.”
Shelby Foote, The Civil War: A Narrative

“The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.”
Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language

“...EVENINGS: See friends. Read in cafés....”
Henry Miller author of Tropic of Cancer, Black Spring, Tropic of Capricorn, and more.

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