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On the Weight of Repetitive Tasks, Forming Habits and the Pursuit of Knowledge

This post was first sent to my newsletter on October 3rd, 2021.
You really ought to subscribe :)


view of a lake from a boat

A long leisurely ride, in a shikara amongst the lakes of Shrinagar

It’s October! Time to play catchup with Jason’s letters! :)
As usual, click the headers to wander off to the originals.

I read a few books and wrote about them!

  1. Brave Enough
  2. This is Water
  3. How to Pronounce Knife
  4. A Mathematician’s Lament
  5. The Comfort Crisis

The first two, I believe, should be mandatory reading for every growing adult.


Seth Godin on The Weight of Repetitive Tasks

The beauty of Seth Godin¸ is that every post of his is darn near quotable!

If we’re lucky enough to work indoors, with free snacks and podcasts in the background, we might not get physically exhausted the way we would moving thousands of pounds of bricks. But the cognitive and emotional toll of repetitive tasks is real, even if doesn’t leave calluses.

The discipline is to invest one time in getting your workflow right instead of paying a penalty for poor digital hygiene every single day.

Hacking your way through something “for now” belies your commitment to your work and your posture as a professional. Get the flow right, as if you were hauling bricks.


The Art of Manliness page on Habit Formation

If you’ve failed at habit building or breaking in the past, you might think you just need more willpower.
That’s not what James Clear argues in this interview. Rather, it’s simply about crafting optimal systems for behavior change. Clear walks the listener through his own research-backed 4-step process for effective habit formation.


The Daily Stoic on the Pursuit of Knowledge

Does the pursuit of knowledge ever end? We need to keep at it, says the Daily Stoic.

So when does this all culminate and coalesce into wisdom? When are you good?
Never. The answer is never.
“Until when is a person obligated to study Torah?” Maimonides once asked, rhetorically.
“Until the day of one’s death.”


So here’s to ever pursuing knowledge! I’ll see you next month, folks :)


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